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Further reading

A collection of resources and further reading to learn more about the issues we must deal with - arranged by subject area.

This will be updated on an ongoing basis to please check back from time to time for new material. Feel free to contact us if you feel you have something that would add to this list.

Abrupt climate change

Link Description
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091130112421.htm A significant shift in climate can occur in only months. In most cases of abrupt climate change we have no lower bound for the time it took.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Younger_Dryas#End_of_the_climate_period "Other proxy data, such as dust concentration, and snow accumulation, suggest an even more rapid transition, requiring about a 7 °C (12.60 °F) warming in just a few years. Total warming was 10 ± 4 °C (18 ± 7 °F)"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abrupt_climate_change#Past_events A list of other abrupt events - including some of the worst mass extinctions we know of. We don't know precisely how fast these happened but there are some potential mechanisms that could explain them happening over rather short timescales (catastrophic methane release for instance).

Threat to civilisation

Link Description
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toba_catastrophe_theory A precedent for human near extinction. Note that while a supervolcanic eruption is severe it is of much shorter duration than the climate change we face.
http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=3359#.UEHEDNZlS27 An article about the sometimes terminal effects of drought on some ancient civilisations.
http://www.thebulletin.org/web-edition/features/climate-change-and-the-syrian-uprising The link between climate change and the ongoing loss of social cohesion in Syria. A small scale example of something that could happen over much larger regions of the world.

Climate change science

Link Description
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8285247.stm A potted history of climate change science - note how long this stuff has been known about for, without meaningful action to date. Failure to act over those decades is what has taken us towards the brink of catastrophic failure today.